MB&F’s HM6 Space Pirate gets a gold makeover

When MB&F released its Horological Machine 6 Space Pirate back in 2014, it caused quite a stir. To some (like us), it was a staggering display of mechanical mastery and to others, it was an oddball that they didn’t understand. Recently however, fresh validation for the HM6 came from the Red Dot Design Awards, where MB&F walked away with a big win. The validation prompted a celebration, and thus the HM6 Space Pirate RT was unleashed with a rose-gold case.

If you love the original HM6 Space Pirate but titanium is a little too plain for you, there's a new rose-gold option on the table.

If you love the original HM6 Space Pirate but titanium is a little too plain for you, there’s a new rose-gold option on the table.

This second version of MB&F’s sixth Horological Machine doesn’t just feature any old rose-gold however. What we have here is a 49.5mm case crafted from rose-gold that has been enriched with palladium. Why has MB&F does this? Typically, 5N rose-gold is an alloy consisting of 75 percent gold and 25 percent copper, and what tends to happen over time is the copper content sitting on the surface of the metal begins to tarnish over time, as a result of constant exposure to oxygen. This is why, after a few years of ownership and wear, you may notice that your precious metal case has lost some of its luster and shine.

By adding palladium to 5N red-gold, MB&F says the copper molecules become fixed, so they do not come into contact with air, which means the metal won’t tarnish. This is something that brands like Omega and Rolex also offer but whereas those brands employ fancy names, MB&F refers to the Space Pirate RT’s case material simply as 5N+ rose-gold.

The titanium strength/support band adds a nice bit of contrast to the HM 6 Space Pirate RT.

The titanium strength/support band adds a nice bit of contrast to the HM 6 Space Pirate RT.

Like the original HM6 Space Pirate, this newer timepiece features a titanium band that spans the length of the watch, which strengthens the case, and acts as support for the free moving lugs. The pivoted lugs, as before, allow the watch to sit snugly on wrists.

Beyond the difference in primary case material, the HM6 Space Pirate RT is the same as the original. This isn’t a bad thing however, while this watch only brings a small aesthetic change to the table, and several months have passed since the original was released, there’s still nothing quite the Space Pirate on offer by any other brand. It’s still a space age timepiece with a incredibly complicated and beautiful movement.

Limited to just 18 pieces, you'll have to act fast to ensure this wondrous expression of creation finds its way onto your wrist.

Limited to just 18 pieces, you’ll have to act fast to ensure this wondrous expression of creation finds its way onto your wrist.

We highly encourage you to check out our original article of the HM6 Space Pirate (click here), as we go into more detail about the watch, its movement and the inspiration that resulted in its creation.

Limited to just 18 pieces, the Horological Machine 6 Space Pirate RT will cost approximately US $230,000.

To learn more about MB&F, click here.

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